The”Handy” Map and Street Guide to Nottingham

Whilst sorting through some Ordnance Survey maps that belonged to my late father, I came across a tatty looking Handy Map and Street Guide to Nottingham.

Handy Map and Street Plan of Nottingham

The Handy Map and Street Guide

 

Measuring 90 x 64cm. The Street Plan in the centre is surrounded by several advertisers, with an alphabetical index to the street names in columns down the side. It looks as though it was produced to be placed on a wall but had been folded up.

The map is not dated but there are various aspects of it that with a bit of research suggest it is almost certainly from the 1920’s. My father was born in 1923 and it is likely to have belonged to my grandfather who lived in St Anns and The Meadows where he worked at Victoria Baths and Portland Baths. Maybe it had once been displayed in the reception at one of these places.

Tram routes are indicated by a red line down the centre of the road.

Map Porchester Gardens

Porchester Gardens showing tram route to the top of Westdale Lane

For instance there is a tram route marked along Woodborough Road to the junction with Westdale Lane. I have previously posted about the history of Plains Road Mapperley which makes reference to the demise of the tram in 1936.

In 1931 the Nattriss family started their car sales and servicing on Porchester Road. The family raced vintage sports cars and would expand onto Woodborough Road. Our obsession with the motor car was under way and unsurprisingly, the tramcar (which had extended to Westdale Lane) ceased operating 1936.

The other term used on the map is Lunatic Hospital to indicate the Coppice Hospital in what is now known as Ransom Road Mapperley. Mapperley Hospital on Porchester Road is referred to as Lunatic Asylum. Both these terms ceased to be used officially in 1930

Map Mapperley 1940s

Lunatic Hospital off Coppice Road (now Ransom Road)

Prior to the building of Mapperley Hospital the mentally ill were kept at The General Lunatic Asylum that was on Carlton Road in Sneinton where King Edward park is now.

When you look for our hospitals as we know them now, the area where the Queens Medical Centre is barely recognisable. We now have the Ring-Road and the industrial area of Lenton. There is a road called Trent Lane that goes from Leen Gate directly to the river. This appears to be the line that the ring road takes to Clifton Bridge. There is no river crossing here and the nearest option would have been Wilford (toll) Bridge. Ironically this is now on the new tram route.

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Old Lenton – Leen Gate and the River Leen shows where the Queens Medical Centre now stands.

The City Hospital is marked by a rather different title; The Bagthorpe Workhouse. The area between Hucknall Road, Sherwood and Nottingham Road, New Basford appears undeveloped. The Prison at Perry Road is titled His Majesty’s Prison.

Map Bagthorpe Workhouse

Bagthorpe Workhouse

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Valley Road in Basford now forming part of the ring road. The area undeveloped by housing.

Here are some of the businesses advertising on the map.

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Beeston’s Changing Times

Nottingham Hidden History Team

by Joe Earp

“The times they are a changing”; so goes the words of the Bob Dylan song, – words which are certainly true for Beeston. As I write this, one of the biggest changes in the town’s history is taking place. Beeston is awaiting the arrival of the extension to the Nottingham Tram system.  High Road is now closed off and around half of the shops in the Square are empty awaiting their fate. One of these is the ever popular Wilkinson’s store (Wilko’s), a shop whose loss will be much lamented.

GE DIGITAL CAMERA The Now Gone Wilkinson’s
Credit: Nottingham Hidden History Team

Changes, to the places where people live are inevitable. Sometimes change is a slow evolution and is hardly noticed. At other time, – as with the Trams, – the change is sudden and dramatic and has a huge impact. There are those who will remember the building of…

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