Nottingham’s music scene continues to amaze!

18 months on and The Mocking Jays are top of the bill at The Maze tonight. You were warned.

PorchesterBus

I suppose there will be some people who have never even heard of The Maze music venue on Mansfield Road in Nottingham. For those of us familiar with it, it seems to have been around forever. In fact its current period of success began in 2007 after surviving a proposal to convert the building into student flats.

Thousands of commuters using Mansfield Road will only see it as The Forest Tavern, an ordinary looking pub at the top of the hill close to the Forest cemetery.

I recall visiting The Forest Tavern some years ago in the later stages of a pub crawl. Ordering a pint of Budweiser for a friend, the chap behind the bar quite rightly pointed out that they served Budvar the Czech beer and not “that American shit”. Whilst he poured my pint of a less well travelled Castle Rock beer, I told my friend that…

View original post 620 more words

Advertisements

Slumming it: A short walk around the Glasshouse Street slum yards

A terrific tour rounď the the Glasshouse Street area. Well researched and well presentwd.

nottinghasm

It’s hard to find a lot of in-depth information about Glasshouse Street when researching local history, though it crops-up quite a bit in the supporting cast in other location’s tales. It gets mentioned in relation to ‘The Charlotte Street area’, a slum that used to sit immediately to the west of Glasshouse Street. It’s also heard of in discussions regarding Victoria Station, which replaced the Charlotte Street area. Central Road (later Union Road) and a public footpath passed over the platforms and tracks of the station, connecting Milton Street and Glasshouse Street. The building of the station also diverted Glasshouse Street somewhat, causing it to curve abruptly north-westwards and connect with Huntingdon Street, when it previously ambled north-east, eventually adjoining York Street (another under-appreciated thoroughfare). It modern times, Glasshouse Street grants access to Victoria Centre’s underground car park, and also hosts a pedestrian entrance to the centre for people approaching…

View original post 1,244 more words

‘We Must Always Love Our Own, Stuart’

A heartwarming tale fron Goose Fare of old.

The Tears of a Clown

Nottingham Goose Fair memories: ‘Big George, The Gentle Giant and my dad.

UP UNTIL THE EARLY NINETIES, ‘George the Gentle Giant’ was a Scotsman who would visit the fair each year who I remember as a youngster being a travelling attraction. Big George Gracie was a Lanarkshire man who measured fully 7ft 3ins tall, weighed 28 stone and stood in size 18 shoes. His size was caused by a brain tumour in his pituitary gland, as I understand.

image

Gentle Giant – George Gracie

The big man’s living was to allow people to come and stare at him on a fairground sideshow stall for a few pennies. People would pay their money and file around his pen. The big man was a most affable fellow, in spite of it all.

I recall dad took me to the Goose Fair one early October Saturday afternoon. After the various round of coconut shies…

View original post 296 more words

Meet You by the Lions!

Nottingham Hidden History Team

by Joe Earp

Two large stone lions guard the Council House steps. These lions have become a famous meeting point for many decades for thousands of Nottingham residents.The ‘Left Lion’ in particular has long since been adopted by locals as a meeting place.

Nottingham’s Market Place or Old Market Square as it is now known has been at the centre of Nottingham life for nearly one thousand years. Throughout history, it has been a meeting place for people of Nottingham as well as the location for local events. For hundreds of years the square played host to the market.

In the late 1920s Nottingham Corporation made the decision to move the market and the 18th century Exchange building was demolished. The square was redeveloped and the Exchange building replaced by the Nottingham Council House. The Council House with its 200 foot high dome and ten and a half ton bell called Little…

View original post 451 more words

Beeston’s Changing Times

Nottingham Hidden History Team

by Joe Earp

“The times they are a changing”; so goes the words of the Bob Dylan song, – words which are certainly true for Beeston. As I write this, one of the biggest changes in the town’s history is taking place. Beeston is awaiting the arrival of the extension to the Nottingham Tram system.  High Road is now closed off and around half of the shops in the Square are empty awaiting their fate. One of these is the ever popular Wilkinson’s store (Wilko’s), a shop whose loss will be much lamented.

GE DIGITAL CAMERA The Now Gone Wilkinson’s
Credit: Nottingham Hidden History Team

Changes, to the places where people live are inevitable. Sometimes change is a slow evolution and is hardly noticed. At other time, – as with the Trams, – the change is sudden and dramatic and has a huge impact. There are those who will remember the building of…

View original post 1,126 more words

The Pretty Windows murder part 2: Theories and speculation.

A well researched article about the Pretteh Winduz case

nottinghasm

In the last post I described the basic facts concerning the unsolved murder of Nottingham pub landlord George Wilson in September 1963. This time I’m going to delve deeper into the crime, reflect on the facts in more depth, look at contemporary newspapers of the period, and put forward some ideas & theories. The newspapers I believe can shed some light on matters.

For those of us who didn’t experience the 1960s first hand, it’s tempting to define the period using easy pop culture references such as mini-skirts, Merseybeat and the football World Cup. Those who did live during that era would doubtless find this a short-sighted view. Flick through newspapers of the 1960s and you’ll find stories of armed robberies, knife attacks, muggings, suicide gassings, burglary and vandalism. Crime in the 1960s was not dissimilar to crime now.

I mention this to contextualise the stabbing of George Wilson. There…

View original post 4,483 more words

Adams Restaurant – Back to the Future

DSC07049

A few days ago I went to a fundraising dinner at the Adams Restaurant and Brasserie.  The event was to raise money for the Stroke Association.

Set in the heart of Nottingham’s Lace Market area; the restaurant is within The Adams Building, a former lace showroom and warehouse. It must be the finest example in the country and is Grade II listed.

Despite being 160 years old, it is the building’s recent history that makes it really special.

Go back 20 years and the building was in a serious state of decline due to rising repair costs. Many floors were structurally unsound.

In 1996, the building was acquired, restored and converted by New College Nottingham. Costing £16.5 million, the project was assisted by the Heritage Lottery Fund and European Regional Development Fund. With its future secured, even Prince Charles attended the official opening in 1999.

The college offers a variety of post 16 courses, with the Adams Restaurant providing a visible showcase for the students in the catering and hospitality sector.

The best way to access Adams Restaurant is a 1 minute walk from the Lace Market Tram-stop. Walking though the new buildings at the end of Warser Gate, a paved square opens up and the entrance to Adams is though the archway straight ahead. Go through a cobbled courtyard and into the building itself.

We were greeted by the students and our coats taken to the cloakroom. Having purchased a drink from the licensed bar, we were made very welcome with a selection of canapes. Individual fried quails egg on crostini providing something different.

The dining area is spacious, light and airy. We had pre ordered from the menu and the meal was served to a good restaurant standard. Our fellow diners seemed to have ordered everything from the menu, which had the following highlights:

Starter: Crispy pork belly, honey and soy dressing, oriental vegetables and toasted sesame seed.

Main: Grilled hake, tomato, fennel, chick pea and tomato stew with an olive gremolata.

Dessert: Passion fruit and vanilla panna cotta.

All in all; a great meal in a great location, and raising money for a great cause.

Adams Restaurant is open to the public at lunch-time during the week and also a couple of evenings. Such is the success of the catering courses that many of the students will go on to a career in the industry. Apparently top chefs Sat Bains and Marco Pierre White keep an eye on the place!

Enjoy!